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Winter 2023 Class Schedule

Winter 2023 class Schedule

Core Courses

Note: this schedule is subject to change, and will be solidified during Fall 2022.

Winter 2023 course listings in GBL_HLTH
Course Title Instructor Day/Time
GBL_HLTH 201 Introduction to Global Health Au TTH 9:30am-10:50am
GBL_HLTH 222 The Social Determinants of Health Locke TTH 12:30pm-1:50pm
GBL_HLTH 302 Global Bioethics Rodriguez TTH 11am-12:20pm
GBL_HLTH 307 International Perspectives on Mental Health Seligman W 2:00pm-4:30pm
GBL_HLTH 320 Qualitative Research Methods in Global Health Hoominfar MW 9:30am-10:50am
GBL_HLTH 321 War and Public Health Locke W 2:00pm-4:50pm
GBL_HLTH 325 History of Reproductive Health Rodriguez TTH 12:30pm-1:50pm
GBL_HLTH 390-0-23 Special Topics in Global Health: Silent but Loud: Negotiating Health in a Cultural, Food, Poverty, and Environmental Caste Mitchell TTH 9:30am-10:50am
GBL_HLTH 390-0-24 Special Topics in Global Health: Hazards, Disasters, and Society Hoominfar MW 3:30pm-4:50pm
GBL_HLTH 390-0-25 Special Topics in Global Health: (Re)mixing Qualitative Methods Mitchell TTH 11:00am-12:20pm
GBL_HLTH 390-0-26 Special Topics in Global Health: Global Epidemics Au MWF 11:00am-11:50am

  

 Elective Courses

Winter 2023 electives will be posted during Fall Quarter 2022.

Winter 2023 elective listings
Course Title Instructor Day/Time
ANTHRO 309 Human Osteology Erin Waxenbaum Dennison F 11:00am-1:00pm
ANTHRO 386 Methods in Human Biology Research Aaron Miller TTH 11:00am-12:20pm
BIOL_SCI 310 Human Physiology Tracy Hodgson TTH 2:00pm-3:20pm
BIOL_SCI 327 Biology of Aging TBA TBA
BIOL_SCI 355 Immunobiology Hilary Truchan MWF 11:00am-11:50am
BIOL_SCI 377 The Human Microbiome Hilary Truchan MW 12:30pm-1:50pm
BUS_INST 394-LK-20 Professional Linkage Seminar: Lessons in Non-Profit Management TBA W 2:00pm-4:50pm
CFS 392 Field Studies in Public Health TBA TBA
CFS 397 Field Studies in Civic Engagement Elizabeth McCabe TBA
COMM_ST 246 Intro to Health Communication Kimberly Pusateri T 3:00pm-5:50pm
COMM_ST 246-CN-65 Intro to Health Communication Kimberly Pusateri W 6:15pm-9:15pm
ECON 307-0-20 (Lecture) Economics of Medical Care Frank Limbrock TTH 3:30pm-4:50pm
ECON 307-0-21 (Discussion) Economics of Medical Care Frank Limbrock F 1:00pm-1:50pm
BMD_ENG 343 Biomaterials and Medical Devices Guillermo Antonio Ameer TTH 12:30pm-1:50pm
BMD_ENG 390-2 Biomedical Engineering Design Matthew Glucksberg,
David O'Neill,
Shana Kelley
MWF 4:00pm-5:50pm
CHEM_ENG 382 Regulatory Sciences in Biotechnology Packianathan Arthur Felse Th 6:00pm-9:30pm
CIV_ENG 361 Public & Environmental Health Luisa Marcelino TTH 11:00am-12:20pm
ENGLISH 381 Literature & Medicine Hannah Chaskin TTH 11:00am-12:20pm
HISTORY 300-28 New Lectures in History: Comparative Genocide Stefan Ionescu
TTH 9:30am-10:50am
PHIL 269-20 (Lecture) Bioethics Lendell Horne TTH 2:00pm-3:20pm
PHIL 269-60 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 10:00am-10:50am
PHIL 269-61 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 11:00am-11:50am
PHIL 269-62 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 12:00pm-12:50pm
PHIL 269-63 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 1:00pm-1:50pm
PHIL 269-64 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 2:00pm-2:50pm
PHIL 269-65 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA F 3:00pm-3:50pm
PHIL 269-66 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA Th 10:00am-10:50am
PHIL 269-67 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA Tu 10:00am-10:50am
PHIL 269-68 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA Tu 5:00pm-5:50pm
PHIL 269-69 (Discussion) Bioethics TBA Tu 4:00pm-4:50pm
PHIL 326-20 Topics in the Philosophy of Medicine Lendell Horne TTH 9:30am-10:50am
PHIL 326-21 Topics in the Philosophy of Medicine Lendell Horne TTH 9:30am-10:50am
PUB_HLTH 391 Global Health Care Service Delivery TBA Th 5:30pm-8:15pm
SOC_POL 333 Economics of Health, Human Capital, and Happiness Hannes Schwandt MW 2:00pm-3:20pm

 

Winter 2023 course descriptions

GBL_HLTH 201: Introduction to Global Health

This course introduces students to pressing disease and health care problems worldwide and examines efforts currently underway to address them. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the courseidentifies the main actors, institutions, practices and forms of knowledge production characteristic of what we call "global health" today, and explores the environmental, social, political and economic factors that shape patterns and experiences of illness and healthcare across societies. We will scrutinize the value systems underpinning specific paradigms in the policy and science of global health practice, and place present-day developments in historical perspective. As an introductory course on global health, the class delves into comparative health systems, including comparative health systems in high- and low-income countries. Key topics will include: policies and approaches to global health, key actors in global health, comparative health systems, structural violence, gender and reproductive health, chronic and communicable diseases, politics of global health research and evidence, and the ethics of global health equity.

GBL_HLTH 222: The Social Determinants of Health

This lecture-based survey in public health and medical anthropology explores how political, economic, historical, and sociocultural forces impact health inequalities at home and around the world. We will explore contemporary illness experiences and therapeutic interventions in context through case studies from the US, Brazil, and South Africa. Students will be introduced to key concepts such as embodiment, medicalization, structural violence, the social determinants of health, and biopolitics. Central questions of the seminar include: How do social categories of difference determine disease and health in individuals and collectivities? How is medical science influenced by economic and political institutions and by patient mobilization? How does social and economic inclusion/exclusion govern access to treatment as well as care of the self and others? The course will provide advanced instruction in anthropological and related social scientific research methods as they apply to questions of social inequality and public health policy. he course draws from historical accounts, contemporary ethnographies, public health literature, media reports, and films.
Fulfills Area III (Social and Behavioral Sciences) distribution requirement

 

GBL_HLTH 302: Global Bioethics

Global health is a popular field of work and study for Americans, with an increasing number of medical trainees and practitioners, as well as people without medical training, going abroad to volunteer in areas where there are few health care practitioners or resources. In addition, college undergraduates, as well as medical trainees and practitioners, are going abroad in increasing numbers to conduct research in areas with few healthcare resources. But all of these endeavors, though often entered into with the best of intentions, are beset with ethical questions, concerns, and dilemmas, and can have unintended consequences. In this course, students will explore and consider these ethical challenges. In so doing, students will examine core global bioethical concerns – such as structural violence – and core global bioethical codes, guidelines, and principals – such as beneficence and solidarity – so they will be able to ethically assess global health practices in a way that places an emphasis on the central goal of global health: reducing health inequities and disparities. With an emphasis on the ethical responsibility to reduce disparities, we consider some of the most pressing global bioethical issues of our time: equity, fairness, and climate change. Particular attention is given to the ethics of research during a pandemic and access to vaccines and therapies for Covid-19. 
Fulfills Area V (Ethics and Values) distribution requirement  

GBL_HLTH 320: Qualitative Research Methods in Global Health

This course provides an introduction to the qualitative methods and develops the practical skills necessary to conduct rigorous qualitative field research on global health topics. Through seminar-style discussions, small-group workshops, and out-of-class research exercises, students will become familiar with nature of qualitative research, and they will learn how qualitative methods are applied at each stage of the research process, including design, data collection, analysis, and write-up.
Fulfills Area III (Social and Behavioral Sciences) distribution requirement

 

GBL_HLTH 321: War and Public Health

This course draws on perspectives from anthropology and related social scientific fields to provide a comparative overview of the impact of armed conflict on public health and health care systems worldwide. Drawing primarily on examples from recent history, including conflicts in the Balkans, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East, we will explore warfare as a crucial sociopolitical determinant of global health disparities and consider organized efforts to respond to the health impacts of mass violence. Key topics that we will consider include variations in the relationship between warfare and public health across eras and cultures; the health and mental health impacts of forced displacement, military violence, and gender-based violence; and the roles of medical humanitarianism and humanitarian psychiatry in postwar recovery processes. Through close readings of classic and contemporary social theory, ethnographic accounts, and diverse research on war, health, and postwar humanitarian interventions, this course will encourage you to build your own critical perspective on war and public health anchored in history and the complexities of real-world situations.

 

GBL_HLTH 325: History of Reproductive Health

The history of reproduction is a large subject, and during this course we will touch on many, but by no means all, of what can be considered as part of this history. Our focus will be on human reproduction, considering the vantage points of both healthcare practitioners and lay women and men. We will look at ideas concerning fertility, conception, pregnancy, miscarriage, childbirth, birth control, abortion, and assisted reproduction. Because, at a fundamental level, reproduction is about power - as historian Amy Kaler (but by no means only Kaler), pointed out, "[c]control over human reproduction is eternally contested, in zones ranging from the comparative privacy of the conjugal bedroom to the political platform and programs of national polities" - we will pay attention to power in reproductive health. And, since the distribution of power in matters of reproduction has often been uneven and unequal - between men and women, between colonizing and Indigenous populations, between clinicians and lay people, between those in upper socioeconomic classes and those in lower socioeconomic classes - we will pay particular attention during this class to struggles over matters of reproduction as we explore historical changes and continuities in reproduction globally since 1900.
Fulfills Area IV (Historical Studies) distribution requirement

GBL_HLTH 390-0-23: Special Topics in Global Health: Silent but Loud: Negotiating Health in a Cultural, Food, Poverty, and Environmental Caste

To be “healthy” is a complex obstacle course that many individuals living in certain bodies have to navigate. Black bodies, for example, are often the tied to (un)health because they are stereotyped as in need to be controlled, managed, and “guided” into healthfulness. In the U.S., these narrow stereotypes are just a few of the ways Black bodies get defined. In this course, we will move beyond those restrictive stereotypes, guided by questions such as, “How does culture define health?”, “How does the food pipeline affect the health of certain bodies?” and “What does it mean to live in an obesogenic environment?” In this course, we examine the connection between health, culture, food, and environment with a focus on what is silenced and what is loud when generating “fixes” for  “diseased” bodies. Silence refers to the disregard and dismissiveness of the narratives and experiences around the oppressions attached to the health of certain bodies. Yet, this silence echoes as Loud when connected to their culture, food, and environment when discussing diseases highlighted in Black bodies such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes.

GBL_HLTH 390-0-24: Special Topics in Global Health: Hazards, Disasters, and Society

This course examines how socioeconomic and environmental factors work together to cause hazards and disasters in human society. In this course we learn the main concepts about disaster such as preparedness, vulnerability, resilience, response, mitigation, etc. We learn that a disaster does not have the same effect on everyone (all groups of people), and factors of social inequality such as race, ethnicity, class, and gender, make people more vulnerable to impacts of disasters. Also, this course, with an interdisciplinary perspective, analyzes disasters in the global North and South. This is a discussion-intensive course for advanced undergrad students. The classes are the student-centered with an emphasis on collaborative learning. The class meetings will consist of lecture, discussion, presentations, teamwork, activities, video/audio materials and projects.

GBL_HLTH 390-0-25: (Re)Mixing Qualitative Methods

To be "healthy" is a complex obstacle course that many individuals living in certain bodies have to navigate. Black bodies, for example, are often the tied to (un)health because they are stereotyped as in need to be controlled, managed, and "guided" into healthfulness. In the U.S., these narrow stereotypes are just a few of the ways Black bodies get defined. In this course, we will move beyond those restrictive stereotypes, guided by questions such as, "How does culture define health?", "How does the food pipeline affect the health of certain bodies?" and "What does it mean to live in an obesogenic environment?" In this course, we examine the connection between health, culture, food, and environment with a focus on what is silenced and what is loud when generating "fixes" for "diseased" bodies. Silence refers to the disregard and dismissiveness of the narratives and experiences around the oppressions attached to the health of certain bodies. Yet, this silence echoes as Loud when connected to their culture, food, and environment when discussing diseases highlighted in Black bodies such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes.

GBL_HLTH 390-0-26: Global Epidemics

From modern pandemics such as Ebola and COVID-19, to ancient scourges such as leprosy and the plague, epidemics have shaped human history. In turn, the response of human societies to infectious disease threats have varied wildly in time and across cultures. We are currently living such an event, and experiencing in dramatic fashion how disease reshapes society. This course will cover several prominent global epidemic episodes, examining the biology of the disease, epidemic pathways, sociopolitical responses and public health measures, and the relationship between the scientific and the cultural consequences of these outbreaks.

GBL_HLTH 390-0-27: Special Topics in Global Health: Community Based Participatory Research

Oftentimes we hear of research done on communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research paradigm that challenge researchers to conducted research with communities. In this reading intense discussion-based course, we will learn the historical and theoretical foundations, and the key principles of CBPR. Students will be introduced to methodological approaches to building community partnerships, research planning, and data sharing. Real-world applications of CBPR in health will be studied to illustrate the benefits and challenges. Further, this course will address culturally appropriate interventions, working with diverse communities, and ethical considerations in CBPR.

GBL_HLTH 390-0-28: Special Topics in Global Health: Native Nations, Healthcare Systems, and U.S. Politics

Healthcare for Native populations, in what is currently the U.S., is an entanglement of settler colonial domination and the active determination of Native nations to uphold their Indigenous sovereignty. This reading-intensive, discussion-based seminar will provide students with a complex and in-depth understanding of the historical and contemporary policies and systems created for and by Native nations. We will focus on the legal foundations of the trust responsibility and fiduciary obligation of the federal government outlined in the U.S. Constitution and Supreme Court decisions. To gain a nuanced perspective, students will study notable federal policies including the Snyder Act, the Special Diabetes Programs for Indians, Violence Against Women Act, and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Additionally, state policy topics will include Medicaid expansion and tobacco cessation and prevention.

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